Infant/Toddlers (0-3)

First Visit

Your baby’s first visit to Oasispark Dental is fundamentally important as it forms the basis of our relationship. We work together with parents and guardians to obtain important information needed to provide excellent comprehensive dental care for your baby. We strive to make this experience fun and relaxing for everyone. At the first visit you will be given a tour of the entire office and have a complimentary consultation with one of our doctors.

We use a “lap to lap” examination in which you are holding your baby on your lap gently laying your baby’s head on the dentist’s lap. Together you and the team members will be able to see into your baby’s mouth and your baby will be safe in your arms.

Establishing your Child’s Dental Home

The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Dental Association, and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry all recommend establishing a “Dental Home” for your child by one year of age. Children who have a dental home are more likely to receive appropriate preventive and routine oral health care. The dental home is the ongoing relationship between the dentist and the patient, inclusive of all aspects of oral care delivered in a comprehensive, continuously accessible, coordinated and family-centered way.

You can make the first visit to our dentist enjoyable and positive. If old enough, your child should be informed of the visit and told that our dentist and our patient care specialists will explain all procedures and answer any questions. The less to do concerning the visit, the better. It is best if you refrain from using words around your child that might cause unnecessary fear, such as needle, pull, drill or hurt. We strive to make a practice of using words that convey the same message, but are pleasant and non-frightening to the child.

Education

Teeth Eruption

Around 6 to 8 months, the first baby (or primary) teeth to erupt are the lower front teeth (lower central incisors), followed closely by the upper front teeth (upper central incisors). Although all 20 primary teeth usually appear by age 3, the pace and order of their eruption varies.

Baby bottle tooth decay

One serious form of decay is the baby bottle tooth decay. This condition is caused by frequent and long exposures of an infant or toddler’s teeth to liquids that contain sugar. Among these liquids are milk and formula.

Putting a child to bed for a nap or at night with a bottle other than water can cause serious and rapid tooth decay. Sweet liquid pools around the toddler’s teeth giving plaque bacteria an opportunity to produce acids that attack tooth enamel. If you must give your baby a bottle as a comforter at bedtime, it should contain only water. If he/she won’t fall asleep without the bottle and its usual beverage, gradually dilute the bottle’s contents with water over a period of two to three weeks.